Swimming Pool Bonding

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  • Published on Jun 22, 2016
  • www.SwimmingPoolSteve.com - This video will teach you how to bond a swimming pool and what the difference between "bonding" and "grounding" is. Bonding and grounding are two different processes which are often confused in the pool industry. Bonding is the process of connecting all metal components in and around a pool system together to force them to have the same electrical potential. Grounding is the process that forces that shared electrical potential to be equal to zero. For more information on bonding versus grounding as it applies to swimming pools you can read this article that Steve has published through Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/bonding-vs-grounding-applies-swimming-pools-steven-goodale/edit
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Comments • 9

  • Caleb Wiegert
    Caleb Wiegert 2 years ago

    Hey steve i go a new portable commercial pool pump mounted to a 2 wheeler/Dolly. No copper wire came with it just the bonding lug on the back. what are my next steps after getting the wire? and where on the dolly should i attach the wire from the pump? Thanks man

  • The Dog Guy
    The Dog Guy 2 years ago +1

    Does a skimmer need to be bonded? My pool is being re-done and I see a bare copper wire it leads from pool equipment but it's not attached to rebar or the skimmer?

    • The Dog Guy
      The Dog Guy 2 years ago

      Swimming Pool Steve I had my skimmer replaced and I was like it's 100% plastic I think and I was thinking why the heck does this need to be bonded. metal skimmer? Wow? lol!

    • The Dog Guy
      The Dog Guy 2 years ago

      Swimming Pool Steve Ok. I don't have a complete copper wire wrapped around my pool. Only 5 8 ga. bare copper wire sticking out from my coping. I connected the bare 8 ga. copper wire with City code approved brass clamps that are designed to be submerged into concrete. The bare re-bar that was exposed after complete demo was attached to the rebar. Now I'm ready to pour my deck with concrete. From there my concrete guy knows what to do.

    • Swimming Pool Steve
      Swimming Pool Steve  2 years ago

      The bonding grid for the pool will be a bare copper wire that wraps around the entire pool. This is used to attach to the steel walls or rebar of the pool in multiple points, as well as to pick up deck anchors, diving board or slide bases, light niches etc. The wire probably connects to stuff, just not where you are currently looking at it. The skimmer itself, being comprised entirely of plastic components, does not need to be bonded. If your pool is a million years old and has an actual metal skimmer then yes, in theory it should be bonded...but also in theory it should be replaced :)

  • Justin
    Justin 2 years ago

    Why do you call it a sacrificial anode? Because it corrodes quickly? Just put a free craigslist 27' above ground pool up and this bonding stuff is new to me. My bottom tracks go into plastic base caps so they are all not touching, is that an issue? Per 2014 NEC do all vertical supports need tied in? WHy is the ground/bond ring around the pool to be 18" away and only 4-6" deep?

    • Swimming Pool Steve
      Swimming Pool Steve  2 years ago

      I am not familiar with the installation requirements you are referencing. In my experience a pool will require at most 5 bonding points around the perimeter which are tied into a bonding grid which is then grounded. I do not work on above ground pools so they may be different. Is the wall panel made from steel? This is how the bonding grid would connect to all other metal components and why only 5 points of contact are usually needed. A sacrificial anode is just that...sacrificed and consumed as part of providing cathodic protection to your pool components.

  • EJConrad
    EJConrad 2 years ago

    Would a zinc anode in the skimmer be sufficient for a non SWG pool?

    • Swimming Pool Steve
      Swimming Pool Steve  2 years ago +2

      In my opinion no. These independent anodes are not tied directly to the bonding grid so they really only help to minimize localized anodization. For the cost of an inline anode, and the improved protection it provides, I would certainly recommend to go the extra mile.