Technology & the human mind | Susan Greenfield | TEDxOxford

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  • Published on Jul 3, 2014
  • This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. What does the future have in store for us, as human beings? In this talk, Susan Greenfield explores how technology affects our personalities by affecting our neurochemistry. Drawing a parallel with climate change, she calls this challenge for humanity "mind change". But far from being a luddite, Greenfield sees a chance for humanity to benefit from embracing some of the changes these technologies will bring - just as long as we make sure to counteract the dangerous ones.
    SUSAN GREENFIELD is a leading British neuroscientist, writer, broadcaster and member of the House of Lords. Whilst specializing in the physiology of the brain, her areas of research include the impact of 21st century technology on the mind, how the brain
    generates consciousness as well as novel approaches to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons. In addition to being published in countless peer-reviewed journals, her work has led to numerous honours and awards including the Michael Faraday Medal from the Royal Society and thirty honorary degrees from universities across the world.
    About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Comments • 27

  • DH
    DH 2 months ago

    That was a brilliant talk and it fits so nicely with my philosophy of technology class. Today we are reading Louis Mumford and soon we will be reading Neil postman and Sherry Turkle and Heidegger and lots more. These problems continue to dog us and the mega machine is as much of an adversary has it ever was.

  • Joe Full
    Joe Full Year ago

    She’s not going to be able to connect to those who aren’t listening !!!!!

  • dugfriendly
    dugfriendly Year ago

    Charlie Crews asked (facetiously) "don't you want everyone to know what you're doing all the time?"

  • Nilo Armstrong
    Nilo Armstrong Year ago

    These are important videos that need translation.. please permit.
    Thank you doctor.👌

  • Aubin Bluet
    Aubin Bluet Year ago +1

    OCTOCON !

  • Lacey &3
    Lacey &3 2 years ago

    I tried, but for tect project;, ur views r out dated

  • weeping willow 1966
    weeping willow 1966 2 years ago

    Or just click on the 'CC' closed captions/subtitle button although subtitles can contain errors.

  • weeping willow 1966
    weeping willow 1966 2 years ago +1

    There's so much to be learnt from TEDx lectures but I didn't appreciate S.G's style of presentation. Animals are very clever & cunning when it comes to sourcing food, & they certainly can adapt their techniques, to accomplish a feed. Goldfish are often the brunt of a cheap gag relating to simplicity of brain power. Perhaps keeping them as pets, with very limited environmental stimulation has made them devolve & not evolve.

  • vgfx_labs
    vgfx_labs 2 years ago

    Brilliant thought paths on this talk .. _ unlike other 'talks' on similar subjects, this one sounds totally relevant and lucid in every moment, I think each and every person is more than ever in need to hear this sort of 'enlightenment', broad view to make sense of what's really going on inside and around them. Thanks for sharing, gonna search more from her.

  • Rodrigo Mariaca
    Rodrigo Mariaca 2 years ago

    I disagree about the goldfish, its brain is also unique, plastic and adaptable, everyone has a certain personality although of course, their behaviors tend to be markedly more standardized than ours from any parameter that comes to mind.

  • Valdus Oswald
    Valdus Oswald 2 years ago

    Her book *Mind Change* was kinda wishy washy..

  • jenny siek
    jenny siek 3 years ago

    Great women Susan..

  • Badrul Hasan
    Badrul Hasan 3 years ago

    nice video

  • Andrew
    Andrew 4 years ago +13

    Take a closer look at the multitude of studies (two) that she cited. Half of the researchers were shared between them. Also, there is no conclusive evidence linking any digital media (particularly videogames) and violent tendencies. Many people are under the impression that we live in an incredibly violent time, thanks to constant exposure to overhyped media attention, but this is not true. Statistically, we live in the safest period in human history. Furthermore, videogames have been found to actually improve hand-eye coordination, puzzle solving, memory, and a variety of other cognitive processes. Videogames are actually being used by doctors and psychologists to treat a multitude of conditions.
    About the only thing I would agree with in this video is that people spend too much time on social media and rely too much on the information at their fingertips. I acknowledge this as a simple opinion however, and will not press the point without substantial evidence of negative repercussions upon society.

    • valar
      valar Year ago

      It's true - people think we live in an incredibly violent time, when all that has changed is that we are ridiculously well-informed of every violent act committed everywhere.

  • David Wilkie
    David Wilkie 4 years ago +3

    A good opinion piece.

  • Paulina Brygier
    Paulina Brygier 4 years ago +5

    Lots of crap here guys, no one into neuroscience wouldn't take this lady seriously. Her conclusions are so far fetched, that not only hard to believe to a critical thinker but also misleading in terms of what the quoted findings actually tell... Unfortunately what's been said here is hardly counter-intuitive, and hence easily absorbed by those prone to easy solutions... One can only wonder, why she's ever allowed to give such speeches.

    • Omie Bergquist
      Omie Bergquist 3 years ago +1

      Paulina do you ever do research before you make such comments or perhaps your a troll?
      Greenfield has been awarded 32 Honorary Degrees from British and foreign universities and in 2000 was elected to an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians. Further international recognition of her work has included the ‘Golden Plate Award’ (2003) from the Academy of Achievement, Washington, the L’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur (2003), from the French Government, and the 2010 Australian Medical Research Society Medal. She was awarded a CBE in the Millennium New Year’s Honours List, and was granted a non-political Life Peerage in 2001. In 2004 and 2005, she was ‘Thinker in Residence’ in Adelaide, reporting to the Premier of South Australia on applications of science for wealth creation. She served as Chancellor of Heriot Watt University 2005- 2012, and in 2007 was elected into the Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. From 2014 - 2016 she held an annual Visiting Professor at the Medical School, University of Melbourne.

    • Asia Bridges
      Asia Bridges 3 years ago

      SUSAN GREENFIELD is a leading British neuroscientist, writer, broadcaster and member of the House of Lords. Whilst specializing in the physiology of the brain, her areas of research include the impact of 21st century technology on the mind, how the brain
      generates consciousness as well as novel approaches to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons. In addition to being published in countless peer-reviewed journals, her work has led to numerous honours and awards including the Michael Faraday Medal from the Royal Society and thirty honorary degrees from universities across the world.

    • MythGame
      MythGame 3 years ago

      @MrFISHING49 would be great if you put the name of the series or the guy here. Thanks

    • Stephen Brockie
      Stephen Brockie 4 years ago +1

      Paulina Brygia i'm not an expert in neuroscience - i came here through my research on technology and education. I was thinking about her conclusion that violent video games desensitise people in the real world interactions. she might have been better served to quickly reference a study that demonstrated it. Which neuroscientist would you recommend checking out in regards to technology and brain developement (focus on education)?

  • Y. C R
    Y. C R 4 years ago +2

    Parents need to educate themselves better to not give their kids a poor, dehumanised start by giving them unlimited amount of technology usage....thank you Susan Greenfield.

  • Roger Clough
    Roger Clough 4 years ago +3

    Consciousnes is the product of the mind's apperception of a previous perception.(Leibniz)

  • d sauce
    d sauce 5 years ago +3

    perfectly well said, great vid.

  • J. K. Jammin
    J. K. Jammin 7 years ago +15

    I wish you guys had a transcript of this. Other than that, good video. :)

    • Ken Bomant
      Ken Bomant 4 years ago +4

      Click on menu . . . [next to share] ;
      select 'open transcript' ;
      click that transcript menu ... & toggle timestamps ;
      highlight all by clicking 1st character and dragging down ;
      copy & paste in a word processor.

  • boy4everjoy
    boy4everjoy 7 years ago +11

    great speaker, great talk, overall great video, thanks for sharing.