Matt Haywood
Matt Haywood
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  • דרור לוי
    דרור לוי 16 days ago

    Hi, I'm a Dror from Israel, I really enjoyed the movie, and I learned, we have a similar smoker in Israel, another brand. A lot of people complain about her not keeping heat I would love to hear from you tips and help Thanks

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 15 days ago

      I would look for leaks around the smoker doors and consider using heat resistant gaskets to try to seal them, but most of these smokers loose a lot of heat through the thin metal. Using the coal method in this video will give you a slow/longer burn. I also would experiment with different heat shields like a pizza stone if you don't want to use sand. I have actually gone back to water because of the moist environment that you get from the water. Hope that helps!

  • Eight Five O Exterior Cleaning

    What is 'newspaper'?

  • SodaTech1
    SodaTech1 8 months ago

    tks for the great info. will use it to improve my smoker . i buy one and the key problem is unstable low temperature...

  • OH IO
    OH IO 8 months ago

    I just bought this smoker used. No owners manual. Any idea where I can find one so I can learn to use this?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 8 months ago

      Here is a similar functioning one. www.manualslib.com/manual/21283/Brinkmann-Vertical-Smoker-Charcoal-Wood-Smoker-Grill.html#manual

  • The Guy Show
    The Guy Show 8 months ago

    ECB Guy right here great video Sir.

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 8 months ago

      Thanks! I don't really use the sand anymore because I like the moisture water or apple juice provides. You can't beat an ECB for cost and backyard smoking!

  • Alexander Brown
    Alexander Brown Year ago

    what is the sand's job?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood Year ago

      The sand is a heat buffer and also retains some of the heat to keep the smoker warm without having to fill up as often. You do lose moisture if you use this method though. I mostly use water or apple juice.

  • Damien Wu
    Damien Wu Year ago

    S g gr

  • jds955
    jds955 Year ago

    Hey i see that you have 2 bowls and 1 has the coals and wood and whats in the other i heard you say sand a lot so is there sand in the second bowl?

    • jds955
      jds955 Year ago

      how would you be able to smoke peppers in it would water or sand be better?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood Year ago

      anatoly ivanov yes, playground sand. You can also use water for a more humid environment.

  • ליאור אליאס

    Question from a new smoker. Do you keep the fire always burning? I wasn't able to maintain heat where ever there's no fire... I am confused because I've read that the heat should come from the coals only and not open fire...

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood Year ago

      You will need to add coals periodically. I would say every hour or two. The coals will be glowing if they are active, but ultimately so.e will burn out to ash. That is why the pan with holes is needed. Shake it gently with some tongs and let some of the ash fall through and add 20 or so coals at a time. The double door design of this one let's you access the coals without losing all of the heat. Let me know if that isn't clear enough.

  • Charles Schwab
    Charles Schwab Year ago

    I have a Masterbuilt and had a hard time keeping the temperature up. Mostly because of ash build up. I going to make some of modifications you suggested and see how that works. Thanks for the tips!

  • Dean Scoundrel
    Dean Scoundrel Year ago

    Many thanks for the video. Hugely useful as I've just purchased my first smoker and it's virtually identical to this one.

  • The Siklos Experience

    Thanks for the video! Exactly what I was looking for! I have a MasterBuilt but I think the same principles apply. They are very similar. All the Masterbuilt videos are with gas and no help to me.

  • M Porter
    M Porter 2 years ago

    Great video with great explanations. Thanks for making it. One minor correction regarding your comment at about 10:39. You say "it takes a little bit more heat to get sand warmed up" (than water). Water has a about 5 times the 'specific heat' of sand, which means it takes about 5 times the energy to heat water than sand to obtain the same rise in temperature. So for a given amount of heat applied the sand will rise in temperature much quicker than the same volume of water. It may not matter in the end, though, since the hot air flow may not be regulated too much by either the sand or the water. Some testing would have to be done to see how much effect either has. I suspect that a simple air baffle may do about the same thing as either sand or water, but that remains to be determined. If true, then your use of sand is clearly an improvement over the use of water simply because the sand/foil method is much cleaner to deal with.

  • Lucifer 825Daryl
    Lucifer 825Daryl 2 years ago

    cool thanks for the video ,

  • nancy charlotte
    nancy charlotte 2 years ago

    What about things like Applewood charcoal ?? I was at the store and got Applewood charcoal for the open bar-be Que. Was given a Brinkmann smoker and it is missing a few parts, like the racks and the down pan. Mostly the guts of the thing easy fix.

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 2 years ago

      It depends. Charcoal is essentially made from charred wood. if it is charred apple wood made into charcoal then you could use it, but because it has been burned once to make the charcoal, you won't really benefit much from regular charcoal. I would burn regular or lump and just use apple wood branches. If you know someone who has apple trees ask them for their branch cuttings in the winter when they prune their trees. the same is true for any fruit woods. Pecan is one of my favorites and anytime there is a storm, you are sure to get twigs and limbs that fall. You don't need a ton of wood. Too much will make it bitter.

  • Simon Chavez
    Simon Chavez 2 years ago

    In the charcoal tray. since it has the bowl an a rack, do you light the charcoals on the rack or in the pan. I just got my smoker an I'm not to sure how to light the charcoal

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 2 years ago

      mine too. you take the bowl/pan that came with it and the metal frame it sits in out, but leave the slide rails in the grill for the wok to slide on. you could use the pan that came with it too, but you would want to drill holes in it. I have also put this kettle grill in the bottom and it will wiggle inside of the grill.

    • Simon Chavez
      Simon Chavez 2 years ago

      The one I purchased has the coal rack but I has a tray an then a rack inside of it.

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 2 years ago

      on the bottom rack there are two sets of slide rails. One is for the water pan and below it is the coal pan. I replace the coal pan with a grill wok that has wing tabs on it and it slides onto the rails. The wok is what I am pouring the coals into.

    • Simon Chavez
      Simon Chavez 2 years ago

      How do I put them in the smoker. Do put the coals on top of the rack or do I put them on the bottom under the rack?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 2 years ago

      Simon Chavez I use a chimney starter that you see in the background on the ground next to the smoker. Place a metal coffee can with the bottom cut out in the middle of the bowl and unlit charcoal around it. Use the chimney starter and fill it with more coals then pour them into the middle of the coffee can once they are grayed over in the chimney. Use tongs to remove the metal coffee can leaving the hot coals snugged up in the middle of the unlit coals so that they will slowly light the coals and burn outward.

  • games 4dayz
    games 4dayz 2 years ago

    I have a masterbuilt product number 2006112. Same design, different brand name. Only paid $50 for it. Drilled holes in the charcoal pan for extra oxygen, works like a charm. A lot of reviews said they were terrible, but I think the people who bought them lacked common sense and ingenuity.

  • Mark Micco
    Mark Micco 2 years ago

    Thank you!!! I just got a vertical Charbroil Smoker for Christmas.....I immediately bought meat for that night to play with it and I had to check every five minutes for six hours straight to get the temp up and they still didn't turn out right.....thank you for making this video because I was very frustrated with this unit which is my very first smoker...

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 2 years ago

      Mark Micco glad it helped. Don't get discouraged, just keep cooking! :) Try the larger wood chunks to get heat up and use the tips in the video and I'm sure you will be having some finget-licking BBQ. Let me know if you need help.

  • Jijacks
    Jijacks 3 years ago

    Hey, let me start by saying I'm new to smoking meats. I got the vertical smoker to try it out and have some fun with. Can you give me any tips or pointers about how I should run the vents and wood chips etc? Mostly just going for pulled pork and occasionally racks of ribs.

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 3 years ago

      Jijacks It depends on the wind and temp outside. Hotter fires generate more heat. So to get a hotter fire you have two components: oxygen and fuel. Drier wood makes better fuel and burns hotter. in the case of charcoal, it is all equally dry and coals don't really burn hotter than other coals. More charcoal briquettes will generate more heat. Dry wood chunks generate hotter coals and lump charcoal is kind of in the middle. That is the fuel part. The oxygen part is controlled by the vents. Smokers make a chimney affect. Air is drawn in through the bottom and sucked up into the flame and exhausted out of the top. Wider open vents on the bottom create more oxygen, but closed vents on the top leave more carbon monoxide in the chamber smothering the fire to some degree. I am in GA so I run my vents on opposite sides about 3/4 way open drafting across the Fla.e and exhausting on the opposite side.

  • MrSuperdave80hd
    MrSuperdave80hd 3 years ago

    *butt

  • MrSuperdave80hd
    MrSuperdave80hd 3 years ago

    how long do you have the but in there for? is it pullable when it's done?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 3 years ago

      I started at 4:30am and pulled them off at 12pm. They were at 200 degrees. I wrapped in tinfoil for the last 30 minutes before pulling. they could have used another 30 minutes to an hour to be extra pullable, but they still pulled at 200 degrees. Average cook temp was 275-300.

  • Conor Bruen
    Conor Bruen 3 years ago

    Have you done a brisket on this unit? if so any tips?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 3 years ago

      Ha ha! Only have done one on a different model. I burned it because I got it too hot! :)

  • Conor Bruen
    Conor Bruen 3 years ago

    I have this same smoker and have been having a hard time with it. Thanks for the tips!!! I drilled holes in the bottom pan and it helped a ton. I haven't tried the sand yet but will next time I use it. I usually only use the top cooking tray and put a foil pan of water on the lower cooking tray. It doesn't help at all with moister but it helps the heat not be direct. Also the lip of the pan directs the smoke where I want it. Thanks for the tips. I was getting fed up with the unit and was going to look into a new one before hearing about these mods.

  • Bryce Marquis
    Bryce Marquis 3 years ago

    I have the round vertical smoker made by brinkmann and after several failed attempts I was on the verge of just throwing it out but the advice in this video has helped so much! Can't wait for a great summer of tons of smoker use! thank you thank you thank you!!

  • samantha smith
    samantha smith 3 years ago

    Thx for this video. I just bought a vertical smoker. My only question regarding the water pan....I usually grill up ribs, chicken, etc. and want to start smoking that stuff. You saying dont put water, instead put sand? I just need some clearification as I was lost on this part in your video....

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 3 years ago

      I actually use either. If I can't sit by and tend the water level and if I want to cook with less fuel, I use sand. If I need more moisture for something like a Turkey I will use juice or water.

  • Travis Washnieski
    Travis Washnieski 3 years ago

    great video. was wondering about some of these issues.

  • Ryan K
    Ryan K 3 years ago

    How long does the new Grill Wok need to be in order to slide safely on the rails? and Do you think with these mods I can hold 250 degrees for 7-8 hours?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 3 years ago

      +Matt Haywood I forgot to mention that you need to remove the coffee can after you put hot coals in.

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 3 years ago

      I usually start my coals in the grill wok and then using heat resistant gloves I put it on the rails and slide in. One trick to make heat last longer is to put a coffee can with the bottom cut out in the middle and unburned coals around the outside. put your chimney of hot coals in the middle for a slow burn towards the outside. based on the size of the pan you will probably need to add more unburned coals ever 3-4 hours, but for a 7-8 hour burn, you probably wouldn't have to do it more than twice. I don't trust my meat to sit on the smoker for 8 hours without looking at it occasionally. I burned the crap out of a brisket once not paying attention. if you want fix it and forget it, smoke for two hours and then put it in an oven at 350 for a few hours to finish.

  • AUser0000001
    AUser0000001 4 years ago

    You gave some really great advice in this video thanks man.

  • John Herry
    John Herry 4 years ago

    I know this video is really old, but THANK YOU for the sand suggestion!! Absolutely brilliant idea

  • Mario T
    Mario T 4 years ago

    I got this smoker for my annivesary and i like it just for what you said the self containment of it you can. Just open the bottom without bothering the meat slide out the heat pan to tend to it now i did see anouther video the guy said the drilling of the holes disnt help i wanna try it do you feel it really helped to do that?

    • Matt Haywood
      Matt Haywood 4 years ago

      Sorry to just now reply. I do think it helps, but I would use a grill wok. It gets temp up higher and helps cooking time. Cook too low and you could end up with spoiled meat. 185 I think is the lowest heat setting you want to cook at but it will take days! Warm on your oven is like 165-175

  • Mike R
    Mike R 5 years ago

    Great video i just picked one up on Craigslist and will be making some pullpork for the games this weekend !

  • LE QU
    LE QU 5 years ago

    I have the Charbroil like this one. I got a Jim Beam stainless grill wok at Walmart, order online pick up in store for $13. Temps improved to a steady 250. The grill wok fit on the rails but would fall off easily. I broke the circle out of the pan rack and the grill wok fit and will now slide on the rails.

  • toneduke
    toneduke 5 years ago

    I have the single door version ...its an ill conceived poorly insulated waste of money.

  • Anthony Williams
    Anthony Williams 5 years ago

    Great video. I just bought this exact model and will try my hand at ribs tomorrow. Thanks for the suggestions.

  • Njtkj 40
    Njtkj 40 5 years ago

    thanks for the tips. i have the same brinkmann. will be smoking a butt in a few days. any tips.

  • Rick Giles
    Rick Giles 6 years ago

    Thanks for the tips. I had already drilled holes in my coal pan, but know I don't think it was enough. I also us a disposable foil pizza baking sheet to catch the ash in mine.

  • Tara Campbell
    Tara Campbell 6 years ago

    Hey, great video. Thanks so much. You really pulled back the curtain and showed us how to use one of these effectively. This is what makes RU-clip so great.

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 6 years ago

    Absolutely! Can't go wrong with it.

  • PoliticsJunkie
    PoliticsJunkie 6 years ago

    300 degrees is to high

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 6 years ago

    turntup304 lava rocks would be great. Anything to absorb the heat and create a buffer from the higher temp of the fire.

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 6 years ago

    wxtim let us know how it turns out!

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 6 years ago

    Thanks! I will say more wood equals more temp. However you may warp your grill wok. They are cheap to replace though.

  • Tiffany Brubaker
    Tiffany Brubaker 6 years ago

    I'm so impressed with these video's that I'm going unconvert my from propane. Great ideas and thanks for the video's. Zach

  • Steven Smith
    Steven Smith 6 years ago

    I have one its the best

  • Michal Twardowski
    Michal Twardowski 6 years ago

    Do you use water and sand together? Also, how much sand do you use? Is it a generous amount or just enough to cover the bottom of the pan? Thank you! I'm excited to try smoking using your method!

  • wxtim
    wxtim 6 years ago

    Thank you for this video. I was on the fence about buying this particular smoker, and your review and tips have about convinced me to go ahead and try it out using some of your tips. Thanks again!

  • Tyrone Holla
    Tyrone Holla 6 years ago

    Instead of using sand do you think it would be a good idea to use lava rocks

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 6 years ago

    Brian, I would buy a grill wok and use it. You will get a better burn and less smoldering with ash that builds up. Make sure you use a good brand of charcoal like Kingsford or a good lump coal. Lump will burn hotter and if you use wood chunks that are not soaked in water you can keep the temp up. The more dry wood, the hotter. If after all of that your temp isn't up, substitute the water pan for a ceramic pizza stone, but be careful to watch your heat or you will Cook too hot.

  • brian campbell
    brian campbell 6 years ago

    I bought this same smoker had to cut holes in the charcoal pan. And even still has a slow start. Any suggestions. Using lump charcoal

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 6 years ago

    The sand goes in the water pan. It will take longer to heat than water but will stay hot longer, using less charcoal. A pizza stone can also work, but watch your heat!

  • Hoodfellaz100
    Hoodfellaz100 6 years ago

    Where do you put the sand at?

  • Johnny Bizzell
    Johnny Bizzell 6 years ago

    Cool! Thx for the insight.

  • knjsolutions50
    knjsolutions50 6 years ago

    So I smoked my first brisket yesterday in preperation for the Superbowl today using some of your tips and tricks. Very excited as to how it is going to turn out. Your tips certainly helped a lot, liked the idea of doing the little bbq pit for the charcoal and wood, worked great, thanks.

  • cj jernigan
    cj jernigan 6 years ago

    best advice: natural charcoal, oven thermometer inside, digital probe outside. IGNORE THE ONE THAT CAME WITH THE UNIT !!

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 6 years ago

    Thanks!

  • wowjunky07
    wowjunky07 7 years ago

    Good review.

  • JewManFew
    JewManFew 7 years ago

    Thanx for the video, it was very informative.

  • JewManFew
    JewManFew 7 years ago

    I have the single door Brinkman and made it a summer project to repaint it and actually get some use out of it since I haven't used it much since the initial purchase.I have found that with the single door, it is an absolute must to also fill the bottom with coals if you want to get any kind of internal heat of my particular model.Just a single layer of coals on the bottom, the pan filled with coals and wood, I can keep it at 225 for about 2 hours before I have to make adjustments.

  • vwdarrin
    vwdarrin 7 years ago

    looking good

  • vwdarrin
    vwdarrin 7 years ago

    looking good lets eat

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    Montesinosa07 - no I do not boil them. There really is no reason to do so.

  • Adontis Rojas
    Adontis Rojas 7 years ago

    Hey do you boil the wood chips?

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    @brobrady I have not had a problem with over smoking, but if you use the lump charcoal, you won't have to use as much wood. Soaking the chunks of wood will also help. As for the meat temp, just get a remote thermometer for 20bucks from walmart to keep an eye on your internal meat temp. Good luck!

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    It does create moisture in the pit and can be used to season, but the main source of moisture in your meat comes from the meat breaking down fat and fibers within the meat itself. Once you have a good bark, you won't get much water penetration. This is why offset smokers can still produce moist meat. The water is mostly used for a buffer between the meat and the heat. Try taking the pan out and you will see what I found out when I let the water run dry one time! :) burnt offering

  • Tino
    Tino 7 years ago

    Oh I see-the water is also suppose to help to keep up the moisture in the pit which the sand does not do. I use either propane or electric smokers, so I just turn the dial to keep the heat up ;)

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    If you decide you want the double door model, you can buy just the door from brinkmann and replace it or look on ebay for one.

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    you need to make sure that you use large chunks of dry wood when smoking and try using lump charcoal or even logs to get the heat up. Another good way is to take fireproof felt and seal the leaks in the door with it. Also, don't trust the door thermometer. It is about 40 degrees off (low).

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    Just make sure you cover your sand with tin foil and use playground sand, not dirt. This will let you keep using the sand over and over.

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    The sand is a heat buffer much like water in a water smokers. However, the sand does not lose it's heat as quickly as water and will not evaporate. This means it takes longer to get the temp up in the beginning in the smoker but it will stay up longer than if you just use water. Plus you won't have to keep refilling the water.

  • Tino
    Tino 7 years ago

    I did not follow what you are doing with the sand? What does the sand do?

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    Kayakbaker. Make sure you also use as large of chunks of wood as you can. Dry logs or large chunks will burn hotter as will lump charcoal

  • Matt Haywood
    Matt Haywood 7 years ago

    Yes. You drill holes all around it at about 1-2 in diameter. You can also get a grill wok in place of the coal pan. It will burn hotter if you use lump charcoal and larger wood chunks. Note: door temp is 50 degrees cooler than actual

  • L'Jay Pearman
    L'Jay Pearman 7 years ago

    Sweet bro....so just drill holes in the charcoal pan....i couldnt get the temp above 100...why is that....

  • Mark Boucher Sr.
    Mark Boucher Sr. 7 years ago

    Just bought one yesterday, doing the maiden smoke today !!! Thanks for the tips !!!

  • DAVE DUDDY
    DAVE DUDDY 7 years ago

    Cool thanks alot....I get mine in the morning so cant wait.